Lifeline

The Center for Ecumenical Studies is a civil/social organizaton of ecumencal origns founded in 1968 in the context of a social call for student activism at the time, similar to that in France and the United States in the 1960´s, with the just commands that the true nature authoritarian nature of the government of Gustavo Diaz Ordaz be brought to an international level. Prior to this year, the second Vatican Council of Latin America put the conditions for a transformation of Christian catholicism that allowed  a glimpse of the dawn of liberty from the promise of the believers to work for justice and peace. In this frame of context, Rolf Lahusen, a German lutheran pastor, founded the CEE as a space for dialogue, with the aim of spreading knowledge, mutual respect, and cooperation between people of different religions and ideologies.

 

Mission

To be a bridge between faith and the social-political, and vice versa, to contribute to the formation and strengthening of people, collectives, and communities, to influence from an ecumenical perspective-to contribute to the diversity, to inhabit the earth humanely-in the construction of dignified conditions of life.

 

What is ecumenism?

To be ecumenical is to be universal, knowing, understanding, and to take into account the diversity of life that inhabits our Earth, and defend the rights of all to live dignified lives in this common home. We believe that the expression, reflection, and action of faith should be realized as a commitment to a dignified life, and for that reason, our ecumenism is:

 

To be a bridge between faith and the social-political, and vice versa, to contribute to the formation and strengthening of people, collectives, and communities that influence from an ecumenical perspective-to contribute to the diversity to inhabit the earth humanely-in the construction of dignified conditions of life. Our ecumenism is:

 

Prophetic, because it denounces the destruction of the common home, and the impoverishment and exclusion of its inhabitants; however, it also announces, constructs, and works for alternative economies, politics, and cultures of dignified life.

Ecological, because it cares for the earth and brings it back to the capacity to generate life in a way of community and solidarity

Educational, because it promotes the construction of a critical consciousness, the knowledge and exercise of human rights in their plentitude

Political, because it promotes organizational capacity and their ability to participate in decision making at different levels.

Theological, because it reflects faith and experiences the divine from the construction of the kingdom and the evangelical ethic, in interaction with other spiritualities